Fish Names That Start With Letter Q – Aquarist Land

Today’s blog post is going to be about the fish names starting with Q. Some of them are pretty obvious, but others may surprise you! Check out the list below and have fun knowing some new names. If there are any species, you think should be on this list, leave a comment below.

First, we’re going to talk about some common and popular fish starting with the letter Q. Then, we’ll show you a complete list of all the other fish names that have Q in the beginning. And we can assure you; you’ll find some new names here.

However, before this one, we have published a few articles similar to this one, which may interest you too.
Fish Names with U in the Beginning
Fish starting with the letter X.
Fishes that start with Z in the beginning.

Most Popular and Common Fishes with Letter Q:

1. Queen Danio:

Queen Danio’s other name is Fowler’s Danio. It’s a tropical freshwater oviparous species that originated from Myanmar, Thailand, India, and similar territories around here. They’re part of the minnow family that is usual in pet fish trading.

Queen Danio-fish that has letter Q in the beginning

In nature, they prefer fast-moving rivers with sandy bottom areas for living. However, if you’re planning to keep them in your fish tank, the 73-77 °F is the best temperature to keep them active.

The Queen Danio can grow about 8 cm in length surviving around 5 years with proper care. Also, their diet includes insects, small crustaceans, and worms.

2. Queen parrotfish:

The Queen parrotfish is a large, colorful fish found in reefs throughout the Caribbean and South America. They can grow up to three feet long and weigh over 100 pounds. Despite their name, they are not related to any type of parrotfish that live near coral reefs in the Pacific or Indian Oceans.

Queen parrotfish- fish starting with Q

Instead, these species belong to their own family called Scaridae. The Queen parrotfish gets its common name from the bright red spot on both sides of its head right behind the eyes. This spot is surrounded by yellow scales, which give it an almost royal appearance.

They are brightly colored species that are abundant in tropical areas! The name “parrotfish” comes from their teeth, which resemble a parrot’s beak. These fish use their strong jaws to crush coral and eat algae off of it for food.

3. Quillback:

The Quillback is a carpsucker freshwater species from the sucker family. They’re native to North America and can survive for an extended period of time, like 50 years. They’re large fish with small heads and have carp-like appearances.

Image Source: nas.er.usgs.gov

The Quillback can reach about 26 inches with an average weight of 7-10 pounds. They prefer tropical freshwater areas in South Dakota to Alabama and from Saskatchewan to Florida.

Moreover, Quillback’s are omnivorous that prefer crustaceans, mollusks, larvae, protozoa, and various aquatic vegetation.

4. Queen Triggerfish:

The Queen Triggerfish or Balistes vetula is a tropical fish that can grow up to 2 feet long. This magnificent reef dweller has bright colors and unique patterns, making it an attractive addition to any aquarium.

Queen Triggerfish- fish that starts with Q

Like many other triggerfish species, the Queen Triggerfish are known for their aggressive behavior and should not be kept with smaller peaceful fishes unless they have been raised together.

They will eat just about anything, including small invertebrates such as snails and crabs. So they should only be introduced into tanks with live rock or artificial corals. If you plan on keeping this beautiful queen in your tank, you must feed them at least 3 times per day.

Also, provide plenty of hiding places because these fish become stressed very easily when there is no place to hide from the light. Moreover, the recommended tank size is around 500 liter or more as they grow quite large.

5. Quillfish:

The Quillfish is an eel-like fish with a long-elongated body. These species are native to North pacific ocean areas that can grow more than 1 foot. The long slender body gives it a snake-like appearance. Their mouth is small, and the tail fin is very thin.

Quillfish that has letter Q in the Start

So far, most of the encounters of this fish happened at night, which is believed to attract by the fishing boat lights. It’s also believed that Quillfish may burrow in the muddy bottom during the daytime.

They’ve two different types of dorsal fins. One of them may provide some sort of defense mechanism. So, they can use them, if threatened.

All the Remaining Fish Names Starting with Q:

The five fish we’ve talked about are the common and well-known fishes with Q in the beginning. Still, there’re a few more we didn’t mention yet. Now let’s check the remaining fishes starting with Q:

  1. Quadratus nelsoni
  2. Quadratus taiwanae
  3. Qianlabeo striatus
  4. Quadratus ancon
  5. Quagga goby
  6. Quakerfish
  7. Quadratus yangi
  8. Quagga cat shark
  9. Queen croaker
  10. Queen snapper
  1. Queen coris
  2. Queensland dottyback
  3. Queensland lungfish
  4. Queensland blenny
  5. Queensland deepwater skate
  6. Queensland school mackerel
  7. Queensland seahorse
  8. Queensland shark
  9. Queensland toadfish
  10. Queensland yellowtail angelfish
  1. Queensland pygmy goby
  2. Queensland-kongemakrel
  3. Queensland frogfish
  4. Queensland groper
  5. Queensland halibut
  6. Queensland mackerel
  7. Queensland sawfish
  8. Queensland stinkfish
  9. Queensland triangular batfish
  10. Queensland trumpeter
  1. Queensland mountain trout
  2. Queensland mouthbrooder
  3. Queensland cusk
  4. Quetzal cichlid
  5. Querimana silverside
  6. Quillfin blenny
  7. Quillback rockfish
  8. Quitobaquito pupfish
  9. Quoy’s garfish
  10. Quilon electric ray
  11. Qurqufan

Winding Up:

All the alphabets have fish names with them. Some have more than others. Fish names with Q at the beginning are not many, but there are a few. We’ve tried to accumulate as much as possible in this article.

Still, some of them could be missing. Therefore, please share your valuable knowledge in the comment section if you know one that missed our eyes. It’ll be beneficial for us, and the other readers as well.

Image Source:

Canva | Wikimedia | nas.er.usgs.gov |

2 Comments

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  1. Its like you read my mind! You appear to know a lot about this, like you wrote the book in it or something. I think that you can do with some pics to drive the message home a bit, but instead of that, this is fantastic blog. A fantastic read. I’ll certainly be back.

    • I am glad you like it. Really appreciate your nice words and thanks.